HOKUSAI KATSUSHIKA, FUJI IN A GRASS GARLAND n. 93

HOKUSAI KATSUSHIKA, FUJI IN A GRASS GARLAND n. 93

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Chinowa no fuji

Series : One Hundred Views of Fuji, Fugaku Hyakkei

Technique: nishikie, woodcuts in two shades of gray and one of pink.

Format: hanshinbon koban (about 183x123 mm)

Signatures : Zen Hokusai Iitsu aratame Gakyorojin Manji

Seal of the artist : Fuji no Yama

Dates : 1834- 1836.

Engravers: Egawa Tomekichi and Tsentaro

Editors: Nishimura Yuzo, Eirakuya Toshiro.

Beautiful test with good contrasts, in a fourth edition published by Tohikedo in 1852 with the characteristic pink tone. Imprinted on Japan paper, in excellent condition, with uncut margins all around beyond the marginal line.

Bibliography:

Stocking GC Hokusai, the old madman for painting , Milan 1999-2000, London, 2003.

Calza GC Hokusai, the hundred views of Fuji , Milan, 1982.

Dickins FV Fugaku hiyaku-kei: one hundred view of Fuji by Hokusai , London, 1880.

Forrer M. Hokusai, prints and drawings , London, 1991.

Hillier J. The art of Hokusai in book illustration , London, 1980.

Lane R. Hokusai, life and works , Milan, 1991.

Salamon Villa T., The hundred views of Fuji, Turin, 1975.

Smith II H. Hokusai: one hundred view of Fuji by Hokusai, London, 1988.

The elegant lines of the slopes of Fuji inscribed in a garland.

In traditional Japan, summer was considered a season of disease and fires and a variety of systems were put in place to ward off evil spirits.

The one represented in the view consisted in hanging a garland of chigaya , a medicinal herb of the rice family, on the torii (portals) of the Shinto temples dedicated to the local Kami .

On the left, a spring gushes from a tree , suisei-ki , water donated by the tree.

Smith believes he locates the scene in the precinct of the temple dedicated to Inari (deity of rice) in Takada, Edo.

In the Edo meisho zue , illustrated guide to Edo, (1834-6) it is reported that here, in the fourth month of Genroku 15 (1702), as a divine sign a miraculous water for eye diseases gushed from an enoki tree, the Chinese nettle tree (the figure on the left brings the water of the tree to the eyes).

Another drawing of the suisei-ki tree is in Mangwa xiv.